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Table of Content

    20 September 2021, Volume 39 Issue 9 Previous Issue   
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    Report on Chinese Adolescence’s Development of Social and Emotional Skills
    Zhenguo Yuan, Zhongjing Huang, Jingjuan Li, Jing Zhang
    2021, 39 (9):  1-32.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.001
    Abstract ( 1299 )   HTML ( 1161 )   PDF (2707KB) ( 1535 )   Save

    This report analyzes the Suzhou data in the SSES main study on 10-year-old and 15-year-old students’ social and emotional skills. The results show that 10-year-old students score higher on all 15 social and emotional skills than 15-year-old students. Among 10-year-old students, girls score higher on cooperation, empathy, sociability, persistence, and tolerance than boys. Except for tolerance, among 15-year-old students, boys score higher on other social and emotional skills than girls. Optimism is by far the most closely related ability to life satisfaction and psychological well-being, followed by energy and trust. Stress resilience and optimism are most closely related to students’ test anxiety. In general, sense of school belonging and teacher-student relationship are positively correlated with all 15 social and emotional skills, in particular with optimism, curiosity and cooperation. In contrast, school bullying is negatively correlated with all 15 social and emotional skills, in particular with emotion regulation (optimism, emotional control and stress resilience).

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    Task Performance: Report on the Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescence (I)
    Xingyuan Gao, Hongyan Chen, Jie Wu, Zhongjing Huang
    2021, 39 (9):  33-46.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.002
    Abstract ( 590 )   HTML ( 581 )   PDF (881KB) ( 814 )   Save

    Task performance is an important part of social and emotional skills. Under the research framework of OECD, it includes three skills: self-control, responsibility and persistence. Based on the data of 10-year-old and 15-year-old students’ participation in OECD Social and Emotional Skills Study in Suzhou, the current paper presents the task performance results of Suzhou students by using descriptive statistics, difference test and regression analysis. The study finds that self-control, responsibility and persistence are significantly related to other skills, and there are significant differences in age and gender, between urban and rural areas, and between general high schools and vocational high schools. Task performance is significantly affected by the relevant factors of background, students, teachers, school and family. It has a significant impact on life outcome variables such as health, well-being, satisfaction, test anxiety, closeness to family and closeness to others. Based on the findings, we make several recommendations for school educators, policy makers and researchers.

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    Emotional Regulation: Report on the Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescence (II)
    Zhi Liu, Ruirui Zhu, Haili Cui, Zhongjing Huang
    2021, 39 (9):  47-61.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.003
    Abstract ( 966 )   HTML ( 436 )   PDF (897KB) ( 912 )   Save

    Emotional regulation is an important part of social and emotional skills. Under the research framework of OECD, it includes three skills: stress resistance, optimism and emotional control. Based on the data of 10-year-old and 15-year-old students’ participation in OECD Social and Emotional Skills Study in Suzhou, this paper presents the emotional regulation performance of Suzhou students by using descriptive statistics, difference test and regression analysis. The study finds that stress resistance, optimism and emotional control are significantly related to other skills, and there are significant differences in age and gender, urban and rural areas. There is no significant difference between general high schools and vocational high schools. Emotional regulation is significantly affected by the relevant factors of background, students, teachers, school and family. It has a significant impact on life outcome variables such as health, well-being, satisfaction, test anxiety, closeness to family and closeness to others. Therefore, the relevant subjects should pay full attention to the cultivation of students’ emotional regulation, clarify their own roles, and choose the right path and strategy to promote the improvement of students’ emotional regulation.

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    Collaboration: Report on the Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescence (III)
    Yipeng Tang, Jie Zheng, Xiaoxue Sun, Zhongjing Huang
    2021, 39 (9):  62-76.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.004
    Abstract ( 554 )   HTML ( 365 )   PDF (933KB) ( 578 )   Save

    Collaboration is an important part of social and emotional skills. Under the research framework of OECD, it includes three skills: empathy, trust and co-operation. Based on the data of 10-year-old and 15-year-old students’ participation in OECD Social and Emotional Skills Study in Suzhou, this paper presents the emotional regulation performance of Suzhou students by using descriptive statistics, difference test and regression analysis. The study finds that there are considerable gaps on collaboration scores with respect to age, gender, and location. There are 14 significantly positive predictors of students’ collaboration scores (home possessions, books at home, safety, friendship, well-behaved friends, daily activities indoor, daily activities outdoor, relationship with teachers, sense of belonging to school, climate co-operation, extracurricular activities, understanding mother, understanding father, and perfectionism parents), and two significantly negative predictors (daily activities online, problems with parents). Students’ collaboration scores are significantly positive predictors of four life outcome variables, including overall health, closeness to family, closeness to others, subjective wellbeing. Therefore, the cultivation of students’ collaboration should be given more scientific and accurate policy support.

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    Open-mindedness: Report on the Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescence (IV)
    Zhifang Shao, Zhi Liu, Shuyu Yang, Zhongjing Huang
    2021, 39 (9):  77-92.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.005
    Abstract ( 644 )   HTML ( 330 )   PDF (978KB) ( 766 )   Save

    Open-mindedness is one of the five dimensions of social and emotional skills under the research framework of OECD. It includes three skills: tolerance, curiosity and creativity. Based on the data of 10-year-old and 15-year-old students’ participation in OECD’s study on Social and Emotional Skills in Suzhou, this report presents the open-mindedness performance of Suzhou students by using descriptive statistics, difference test and regression analysis. The study finds that there are considerable gaps on open-mindedness scores with respect to age and gender, school location (urban vs. rural), and high school stream (general vs. vocational). Open-mindedness is significantly affected by background, student, teacher, school, and family-related factors; it has a significant impact on life outcome variables. Therefore, the cultivation of students’ open-mindedness needs more scientific and accurate policy support.

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    Engaging with Others: The Report on the Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescents (V)
    Zhongjing Huang, Qian Wang, Huanchun Chen, Xingyuan Gao
    2021, 39 (9):  93-108.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.006
    Abstract ( 755 )   HTML ( 344 )   PDF (987KB) ( 1166 )   Save

    This study uses the data from the OECD youth social and emotional skills assessment in Suzhou, China as the data source to present one dimension of the social and emotional skills survey about engaging with others. The results show that there is a significant medium correlation between engaging with others and other dimensions of social and emotional skills. There are significant differences in engaging with others among students of different ages, genders, schools and regions. Also, students’ engaging with others is significantly affected by students’ safe feelings and peer relationship, family background, teachers and school factors. Engaging with others has a significant impact on the life outcome variables of different groups of students. Therefore, the research results deliver some implications. First, intimate peer relationship is essential for improving students’ engaging with others. Second, harmonious teacher-student relationship is an important guarantee to promote students’ engaging with others. Third, good school atmosphere is the key to improving students’ engaging with others. Finally, positive family education is an important foundation for developing students’ engaging with others.

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    The Technical Report on OECD Study on Social and Emotional Skills of Chinese Adolescence
    Jing Zhang, Yipeng Tang, Jiajun Guo, Zhifang Shao
    2021, 39 (9):  109-126.  doi: 10.16382/j.cnki.1000-5560.2021.09.007
    Abstract ( 1041 )   HTML ( 598 )   PDF (780KB) ( 1624 )   Save

    This technical report presents the analysis of Suzhou data in the SSES main study and the assessment of psychometric properties of items and scales that involve a series of iterative modelling and analysis steps. These steps included the calculation of Alpha and Omega to evalute the subscales’ relibiabilities; the application of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to evaluate constructs; multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) to review measurement equivalence across groups (age cohorts and gender groups); and using the Item Response Theory (IRT) and Generalised Partial Credit Model (GPCM) to scale items and generate scores for study participants.

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